Back pain

Most of us will suffer from back pain at least once in our lives. A one-off episode that lasts a few weeks is common, and should be treated by your GP. However, when the pain persists, and leads to absences from work and a decline in quality of life, the root of the problem needs to be identified.

Unfortunately current diagnostic tools, including MRI scans, are often not enough to diagnose the problem, and we can only identify the anatomical structure or structures causing the pain by using anaesthesia.

Essentially, we anaesthetise the structure we believe to be causing the pain, and if the patient’s pain clearly decreases, then we have identified the causal element. More targeted treatment is then possible.

Cervical pain

Diagnostic

  • Cervical facet block

    Cervical facet block

  • Cervical selective nerve root block

    Cervical selective nerve root block

  • Cervical discography

    Cervical discography

Relevant treatment

  • Cervical epidural with cortisone injection

    Cervical epidural with cortisone injection

  • Transforaminal cortisone injection

    Transforaminal cortisone injection

  • Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

    Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

  • Cervical facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

    Cervical facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

  • Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

    Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

  • Intradiscal treatment

    Intradiscal treatment

Dorsal pain

Diagnostic

  • Thoracic facet block

    Thoracic facet block

  • Thoracic radicular block

    Thoracic radicular block

  • Thoracic discography

    Thoracic discography

Relevant treatment

  • Thoracic epidural with cortisone injection

    Thoracic epidural with cortisone injection

  • Transforaminal cortisone injection

    Transforaminal cortisone injection

  • Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

    Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

  • Thoracic facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

    Thoracic facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

  • Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

    Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

  • Intradiscal treatment

    Intradiscal treatment

  • Intercostal blocks

    Intercostal blocks

Lumbar pain

Diagnostic

  • Lumbar facet block

    Lumbar facet block

  • Lumbar radicular block

    Lumbar radicular block

  • Lumbar discography

    Lumbar discography

  • Sacroiliac block

    Sacroiliac block

Relevant treatment

  • Lumbar epidural with cortisone injection

    Lumbar epidural with cortisone injection

  • Transforaminal cortisone injection

    Transforaminal cortisone injection

  • Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

    Pulsed radiofrequency of the dorsal root ganglion

  • Lumbar facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

    Lumbar facet thermal ablation using radiofrequency

  • Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

    Facet intra-articular cortisone injection

  • Intradiscal treatment

    Intradiscal treatment

Lumbosacral pain

Relevant treatment

  • Sacroiliac cortisone injection

    Sacroiliac cortisone injection

  • Sacroiliac thermal ablation using radiofrequency

    Sacroiliac thermal ablation using radiofrequency

Persistent pain after back surgery

Back surgery is complex. The back comprises a variety of structures which can all cause pain. Something more than just a “mechanical” approach is required. Even if we see a damaged area on an X-ray, this may not necessarily be causing the pain.

Some very damaged backs can be painless and some healthy backs are quite painful. This is due to the complex interactions between the nervous system and bone structures, the anterior joints (discs) and the posterior joints (facets) of the spine.

This complexity is the reason why surgery cannot solve every problem and indeed sometimes fails. Such failures make things difficult and treatment is complex, requiring multidisciplinary strategies often including nervous system modulation techniques.

Persistent pain after back surgery

  • After cervical spine surgery

    After cervical spine surgery

  • After thoracic spine surgery

    After thoracic spine surgery

  • After lumbar surgery

    After lumbar surgery

Learn more about pain